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of bipartisan consensus here at home. united states and russia accounts for the vast majority of the world's nuclear weapons with roughly 15,000 total warheads in the strategic-non- strategic basket. bilateral relations between the united states and russia are not what they have been in the most recent past. neither the united states nor russia faces issues were it requires them to be armed to the teeth were the effectiveness of each country's stock pile was proved to be prohibitively expensive. perhaps in past times, when the united states and russia targeted each other, the investment in maintaining the effectiveness of the stockpile was easily justified. discussion on the resize and content of the arsenal has been traditionally thought of in terms of threats, the size of the competing arsenal, geopolitical tensions, nato alliance security, etc. historically come a little consideration was given to funding the stockpile complex as there were general bipartisan and bicameral agreement in the intrinsic value of the nuclear arsenal strategically and as a deterrent. now, however, in the thir
give the world some indication of how russia, china, the u.s., and essentially all major nations of the world to view the threat of a nuclear >> thank you, senator, for being here. and thank you for your military service. my single biggest concern about the nomination is the dramatic flip-flops between your past statements and record and what you are saying as a nominee. and they are about key, core issues. we have discussed some of those today. i want to focus on that, and i apologize if i go over some of the things that have come up before. i could not be here for most of the hearing. in 2006, when israel was responding to attacks by hezbollah from lebanon, you call that response, "a sickening slaughter." and you accuse israel of "the systematic destruction of an american friend, the people of and country of lebanon." what do you say about those statements?>> well, first, i said them. i have been asked about them. i have said that i regret saying that. it was within the larger context of a speech i made about what was going on, a thirtysomething days of war going on. i also inc
we want to share with you. from the new york times -- speaking of russia, a story inside the washington post, getting a fair bit of attention -- japan as number 3, 83 years. the u.s., 51st, 78.5 years. russia is 164, with the average life expectancy of 66.5. as you can see, a lot of young russian women smoking, which is prevalent throughout the country. president putin saying, it is time to cut smoking. roger joins us from missouri, as we get back to your calls and comments on sequestration. one week to go. will it matter? caller: hello, sir. how are you? at 48 years of age, i was 100% disabled. for me and others like me, how was it going to affect that part? host: will you be impacted, do you think? caller: i'm curious. host: what is your biggest concern? caller: if they cut off my funding. host: what is your wife saying? caller: if the cut the pay check off. host: the biggest cuts will be to the military. most of the social programs will not be harmed. thank you for the call from missouri. from the twitter page -- another look at another set of numbers. hillary clinton,
clear that the syrian people would be much better off if china and russia not blocked effective action authorized by the united nations. can my honorable friend say what we're doing to try to help the poor people of syria? >> hear, hear. >> well, first of all, my right old friend, the international development secretary has, like me, visited the syrian border and seen the refugee camps for herself and britain, i believe, with is the second largest donor for health and aid into those camps and is right to say one of the biggest thing to happen is for the chinese and russians consider again their positions and recognize the transition at the top of syria would be good for the whole of that part of the world and i believe good for russia as well. we should continue to work with the opposition groups in syria to put pressure on the regime, not the least through sanctions, but also provide aid and health for those who are fleeing it. >> graham m. morris? >> thank you, speaker, seaham school of technology serves a growing population and some of the most deprived wards in the country and need
getting a nuclear weapon. at the same time, we will engage russia to -- our ability to influence others depends on our willingness to lead and meet our obligations. america must also face the rapidly growing threat from cyber attacks. now, we know that hackers steal people's identities and infiltrate private e-mails. we know foreign countries and companies swiped our core in -- swiped our secrets. now we must protect our -- we cannot look back years from now and wonder why we did nothing in the face of real threats to our security and economy. that is why earlier today i signed a new executive order that will strengthen our cyber defenses by increasing information sharing and developing standards to protect our national security, our jobs, and our privacy. [applause] but now congress must act as well, by passing legislation to give our government the greater capacity to secure our networks and to deter attacks. this is something that we should be able to get done on a bipartisan basis. even as we protect our people, we should remember that today's world events, not just dangerous, not j
states. the two the started it, united states and russia, have the largest arsenal. everyone has dozens. the united states and russia have 95% of the weapons. then you get united kingdom, france, china, india, pakistan, each with somewhere between 100 and 200 nuclear-weapons. north korea has a couple of weapons, maybe somewhere between six and 12. every time the test the use up some of their plutonium. the negotiated agreement in the 1990's with the nine states. host: what is the infrastructure that is needed to be a real threat? guest: that is a very quick -- a very good question. north korea cannot deliver this weapon. it is probably too bulky to put on a plane or missile. there is not much they can do with it. baby fat exit. but that is about it. most countries get a clear weapons and that is to stop other countries to stop from attacking them. it is one of the reasons nuclear-weapons have not been used in 60 years, despite the united states being in major wars. no one has used a nuclear weapon and that is because it not have much military value. you are seeing this change, particula
relationship changed and evolved with russia during the obama administration? what are the positives and negatives? guest: i think what has happened with russia, putin, who is the leader of russia, who came from the k.g.b., who came from the old soviet union, in my estimation is going back to his bad old ways. there was great hope for democracy in russia and nominally there are still elections and there's democracy but putin has consolidated power and has made it very difficult for democrats in russia to be able to have democratic government. and that's the big worry. and of course when you look at what russia has done and what china has done in the united nations, they have wielded their veto power and made it difficult for us to slap sanctions on iran, to help prevent iran from having a nuclear weapon. they have not been good players. and so i've seen russian democracy slide backwards. as long as putin is there, and it's really a shame because i think the russian people really want democracy. and i think putin is trying to be like the old communist leaders that we all remember, khr
: with russia, putin came kgb and is going back to his bad old ways. there was hope for democracy in russia. putin has consolidated power and the difficult for democrats in russia to be able to have democratic government. that is the big worry. look at what russia and china have done in the united nations. they have made it difficult to slap sanctions on iran and to prevent iran from having a nuclear weapon. i have seen russian democracy slide backwards as long as putin in there. i think the russian people want democracy. putin is trying to be like the old russian leaders and trying to rule with an iron fist. i think it strangles russian democracy. we see less and less freedoms for the people. they are an important country. host: we have another tweet. host: you have nothing to do with this nomination. what a year thoughts about senator hagel? guest: if you start a precedent that you need 60 votes, i think that is a bad precedent. i've had some questions about senator hagel. majority should prevail. host: how would you vote? guest: i don't like hypothetical. once you start with this nominat
china and korea and russia, and these countries have done more to promote domestic options for these children and have done more to reduce the number of children they are placing outside their own countries dramatically. china in 2005 placed 14,000 children in u.s. families, and last year, it was a little over 2000. there's also been pressure on countries to look at their own systems to make sure they are avoiding any forms of corruption. oftentimes when countries do that, they completely suspend international adoption programs, and the result is children stay in foster care or institutions. host: i believe that is the case particularly regarding russian adoptions. the headline from the "national journal" -- talk to us about what the situation is and how we got to where we are. guest: there was a piece of legislation passed by congress, and there was a provision addressing human rights issues in russia, and the russian people felt like it was a slap in the face. they chose to respond by passing a ban on adoption by american families. two things are a sad about this -- that
russia and the united states. it's not true any more. our intelligence has told us since 2007 that iran will have that nuclear capability and a delivery system by 2015. so it's other countries that are involved in that. the question i would ask you, in your book you wrote that we must once again convince the world that america has a clear intention of fulfilling the nuclear disarmament committee -- commitments that we have made. the question, a bit more recently you said, i believe providing necessary resources for a nuclear modernization of the triad should be a national priority. do you stand by your last statement? >> my last -- >> your last statement saying -- i believe that providing the necessary resources for nuclear modernization of the triad should be a national priority? >> absolutely should be. i agree with that. and that's what the policy of this administration is. >> well, i'm merely bringing out the inconsistency because when you were involved with supporting the global zero or whatever that group, the organization was, their declaration is, quote, we the undersigned belie
would be good for the whole of that part of the world, and i also believe good for russia as well. we should continue to work with the opposition groups in syria, put pressure on the regime, not least through sanctions and also provide aid and help for those who are fleeing it. >> thank you, mr. speaker. seeing school technology -- [inaudible] some of the most deprived wards in the country. it is in need of replacement. will the prime minister acknowledged that the real reason for further 15 month delay in the report, in my constituency and others come is because the banks who continue to pay themselves huge bonuses simply refuse to lend the money on the 25 year term demanded by his education secretary? would he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? [laughter] we need our new school. >> i will leave the latin to the mayor of london if that's all right but also to have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is if you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what was previously labour government did in his earl
now live in. evraz of russia owns the steel plant in claymont. german-based fraunhofer plans to expand its research and development in newark. companies from many other countries are important employers throughout our state. this is the world we now live in. around the country, companies are producing more than ever, but as a result of productivity gains, they sometimes do so with fewer people. this is the world we now live in. there are 3 billion people in the world today looking for jobs, but only 1.2 billion jobs available. this too is the world we now live in. more global. more productive. more competitive. it is a new world of unprecedented opportunities - to create new partnerships, to sell to new customers, to innovate and collaborate in ways previously unimaginable. but it is also a world with new and formidable challenges to attract and retain employers that have more options than ever, to educate our children to higher standards of job readiness, to invest in the future as we care for an aging population. these challenges demand an understanding of the world as it is and a vi
spokesman will have to stand up after russia has used a drone against a dissident in the next country. the state department will have to explain why that was a bad drone strike in comparison to the united states that only conducts good and lawful drone strikes. that isn't working for our government -- that is important for our government to lay down as precisely clear roles for the use of drones. >> is it the case that if russia or china or someone were doing what mr. cole posits, we would condemn that out of hand? we would not say this trend strike was ok and that one was not. >> if russia or china were being attacked by a terrorist group that was indisputably producing -- posing imminent threat. >> the chechens attacked them at one point. >> if they were in another country posing imminent threats to russia and the country they were in was unable to prevent that threat, i think we would have to acknowledge rushers right to defend itself. >> mr. bellinger and said we need to process. not judicial process. i do not understand how the determination by an executive branch official withou
, we are dealing with a decision made by russia to impose a ban as a result of the use here of a chemical. it is not scientifically based, and is contrary to international law. the trade office and our office have stated clearly it is our expectation that russia will reverse that decision. that is another risk to the livestock industry that is man- made. fortunately, we got some good news yesterday, as a scientific commission from oie, has indicated that the u.s. can now be considered a low risk nation for bse. that will further be confirmed this summer. we got further good news with opening of markets, be considered a low risk particularly for our beef. last month, we talked about the opportunity japan is now finding for a wider market in japan, which is good news. we have seen korea, and the opportunity that presents. we have seen mexico reduce its restrictions. hong kong will join that list, by taking boned beef products of any age, and bone-in beef of less than 30 months. but these barriers still exist. which is why it is necessary when you have the resources and ability
that russia and china will not come aboard and stays within the system, stasis is the policy. this is a way of rating things. -- rigging things. if we come to a determination that the objectives that i listed before our worthy and necessary objectives, so that you have justified and and you discover that the un is precisely the antithesis of any meaningful means to accomplish this, it is pretty clear that staying within the united nations framework is a formula for doing nothing. putin has been given a veto over our foreman -- foreign policy. it unburdened the administration of the challenge of to face this problem directly. this has been going on for 22 months. if putin is not going to relent, we know about him. he believes in the heavy footprint. not a light footprint. i do is, that it was long ago time to go outside the un and the united states should find its allies. we will find such allies and we two a compost those objectives. >> are we hiding behind putin's skirts to avoid u.s. action? >> putin would love that phrase. [laughter] >> i don't think so. the reality is, it is fear of the
. negotiating the new start treaty with russia was an example of traditional diplomacy at its best. then working it through the congress was an example of traditional bipartisan support at its best, but we also have
who fled the czarrist russia come here and that grandson became the majority leader of our house of representatives. that's what this country is about. [applause] you know, in kitty hawk, north carolina, who bicycle job me-- two bicycle shop mechanics gave mankind the gift of flight. the wright brothers flew only 22 feet at that time, 18 feet in the air, but they performed a miracle.as a result, 66 years later, this country put a man on the moon and brought him back. that is who we are. we can do an enormous amount. the wright brothers' father gave them a toy helicopter and never wanted his two sons to fly together for fear that he'd lose them. and seven years after the original flight.in 1910, milton gave them the permission to fly together. it only lasted six minutes. later that day, orville took his 82-year-old father up into the air. it lasted seven minutes. rising 350 feet at that time. well milton shouted, higher, orville, higher. it is a great testament to what our country is about. in america, we have higher expectations. since our founding, we believe that we could be th
on this day in history in 1908 sergei rachmaninoff premiered his symphony number two in st. petersburg, russia. rachmaninoff was a technical pianist. history records he rarely missed a note despite the enormous complexity of his compositions. but you chose to use your hands to orchestrate other kinds of efforts. you worked both ends of pennsylvania avenue. you and sylvia advocated for the purity of public service. then the nation called again and you answered again. so for the past four years you have led those in the intelligence and defense communities, those trusted with protecting our nation and our families. you have led the fight for the proper amount of resources. you balanced the threat of external attack with the threat of internal insolvency. you once said diversity in america is as old as this nation itself. you did more than just speak about it. you took action. you have insured our forces will be able to draw upon the very best this nation has to offer. you have overseen the fielding of new capabilities to meet the threats of tomorrow, and you have demonstrated that steadfast comm
of for iran but may be more for russia, which seems to be at least aware of the fact that they -- assad, might have a short half-life is to move over the other side of the fence with brahimi. on our side, this is not a popular view, but to join in with preconditions to negotiations and drop them all, there's no good negotiation, in my view, that starts with the other side requiring it to give up as a consequence. that is not realistic. i do not know why we jump on that? it may have been seen as the one element necessary to keep the syrian obligation together what we tried to move in the other direction, but now that he has made his point of view, we have something of an open door. i would verily like to see, and i do not think the iranians would support it come about the humanitarian cease-fire based on the commitments in negotiations. i also have my own doubts as to whether a transitional government makes so much sense and whether we ought not to arrive to elections. the syrian election commission and the u.n. election commission might be a better way. we can argue for a year and a half about
with a decision made by russia to impose a ban as a result of the use here of wrecked help a mean -- of a chemical. it is not scientifically based, and is contrary to international law. the trade office and our office have stated clearly it is our expectation that russia will reverse that decision. that is another risk to the livestock industry that is man- made. fortunately, we got some good news yesterday, as a scientific commission from oie, has indicated that the u.s. can now be considered a low risk nation for bse. that will further be confirmed this summer. we got further good news with opening of markets, particularly for our beef. last month, we talked about the opportunity japan is now finding for a wider market in japan, which is good news. we have seen korea, and the opportunity that presents. we have seen mexico reduce its restrictions. hong kong will join that list, by taking boned beef project -- products of any age, and bone -- in beef -- bone-in beef of less than 30 months. but these barriers still exist. which is why it is necessary when you have the resources an
is that it is incurring in certain countries. we were in russia three years ago. i said there was so much fraud going on. there was not enough cooperation going on between the russian authorities and those of us in the industry trying to fight fraud. since then, they are participating. governments understand there are certain hotspo for most internet fraud. the government are now . we put over 60 people in jail in romania who were internet fraudsters. alternately, i think that process will continue. -- ultimately, i think that process wi continue. >> there are many competitors abroad. how much of your focus is moving overseas? >> ebay is global. 60% of the revenue is outside the u.s. paypal is 50% outside of the u.s. 25% is cross-border. they're both very global entities. we are continuing to expand globally. there are 2 billion internet users. that'll be 4 billion in the next few years. look at where th growth will be. 80% will be in emerging markets. people accessing the w for the first time in their lives. it can be done through a phone or a laptop. we see enormous growth opportunity. we are growing
consolation to the working mom. russia bills are high. your kids have needs that are getting more expensive -- for grocery bills are high. she is trying to get by. i think all of us know getting by is not the american dream. host: as you hear what eric cantor had to say, what was striking about that speech is its focus on domestic agenda, a middle-class agenda items and not some of the polarizing topics we've heard from republicans in 2012. guest: i'm a firm believer that the republican message on fiscal policy trump's the other sites message. and the majority leader, eric cantor has said, that is it benefited the economy? is it creating jobs? he is right on. there is no more important issue in this country. we have a basket full of issues -- the economy and job creation and death. that grouping has to be dealt with -- the economy and job redecoration -- creation and debt. host: 16.5 trillion is the nation's debt, and yet wall street continues to seek a record numbers. does it matter? is it resonating with americans? on main street. is if you do not have a job, -- and again, the focus needs
, or other kinds of support? is there a way that the regime can be displaced given russia's support military and otherwise? >> i will answer your first question and let the secretary answer questions two, three, and four. why should they come and meet? because countries have been helping them and because we are precisely meeting to determine how to help assad change the calculation on the ground. i have said that he needs to be able to change his calculation. president obama has been engaged in examining the way that we may be able to contribute to that. that is the purpose of this meeting in rome. i would urge syria opposition to join us as a matter of practicality and informing us. i would say to them ahead of time that in our discussions today, in washington, which prompted us to accept this meeting with a new secretary of state that a beginning moment of the second term, president obama has expressed concerns about it. this moment is right for us to be considering what we can do. we understand that the syrian people want to see results in this conference. i would say, so do we. the best
. it was a lost opportunity of strengthening he could have done in the region. for china, iran, and russia and pakistan, we need more allies in that region and not to isolate ourselves. to leave afghanistan too quickly will put them in the arms of other countries. we would miss an opportunity to grow a real partnership over there. i definitely think maybe that's not military, maybe state department stuff instead. [indiscernible] i feel like cutting banks' stock will limit our ability to have that impact. when we talk about the american economy and american workers and values, it's good for us to be good to other places and that helps us here at home too. [indiscernible] it affects us in an indirect way, maybe not as much as social security and medicare. sequestration has really gotten people up in arms. i was looking for more of him to talk about that or how he was going to reduce the deficit host: we will talk about all the issues that president obama laid out in the state of the union address including the responses by the republicans. lawmakers will join us on the show. our boast is --
from tyranny, not about hunting. host: a lot of stories deal with the asteroid over russia. this is the announcement of a hearing taking a look at asteroids. it is from the house science, space and technology committee. according to chairman of lamar smith -- this morning a smaller meteorite hit a russian city injuring hundreds. it will invest in a future hearing in the house of representatives. democrats line. caller: i just want to say that many conservatives have been saying for the last couple of years that they are against spending. we have to cut back spending. all of a sudden they say we should put an armed guard in every school, turning them into fortresses. if you look at how many schools there are, there are a hundred thousand fund -- 100,000 public schools. that includes just high schools, middle schools, and elementary schools. i will let you do the math on how much it will cost to turn every school into a fortress. against spending. at the drop of a hat they are ready to spend all of the money to turn schools into fortresses and they want to handguns to teacher
drawing some lines if we have any hope of dealing with countries like russia and china on this subject. that discussion has not really started. >> thank you. i want to raise another topic. half of my time is spent in academia and one of the favorites things for the provost and others to talk about is interdisciplinary research. everyone loves it and supports it. in practice, no one really wants to do it. i wonder if there's an analogy for joint operations of the military? i think they are viewed as a wave of the future and many successful operations of joint collaboration across services. the question i have as a total outsider is, is there a way for joint operations or joint planning to participate in the drawdown, for the budget? >> sure. i think one of the things that has happened, particularly as you talk about jointness is the creation of large and joint headquarters. if you look at the service personnel allocations, they are sized for the services. they're not sized for the growth and the number of joint headquarters that are taking place. so the services are providing people to
is a core piece of policy so when people, like russia go to the hill and they are not asked what are you doing on human trafficking, that sends a message to them. so i think that is one of the things, it is the notion of smart engagement on all of our parts. 12 years in, fighting human trafficking equal to this crime that we've identified, is going to take policy innovation, private sector leadership, civil society expertise and grass roots mobilization. as senator kerry said a couple of months ago when the executive order came out, it boils down to this, we have to spot it and stop it. everyone can do that. i'm confident that in the years ahead we can find the ways to stop it. moving from a we don't know to we're making progress. moving from what has been seen as a rigger free zone to one cha is data driven. that is going to take all of you. not saying that someone should doll something about this but saying what can i do about this? tomorrow morning think about what lincoln thought about on the 31st of january in 1865. if you've seen the movie you realize he was counting votes. he was
this morning. host:rt is a russia today. here is one last tweet -- here is a story from "new york times the media distributor." guest: time warner had intentions to drop tv because of its low ratings. they are now are being aced -- s to replace it with aljazeera america. there's nothing to see yet. they have watched aljazeera english coverage and the negotiations have been under way. i also live in brooklyn, channel 92 on time warner carries aljazeera. it is on as we speak in new york. ultimately, i hope they will carry it. it is an important carrier that presents a wide variety of channels and news and the spectrum for is people and we would like to be part of that. we don't think there is any reason we should not be. host: bob wheelock is executive producer for the americas and this started -- trying to establish the new aljazeera america channel. coming up next, we'll take a look at critical reporting about bonuses paid to company executives related to the u.s. bailout. later on, our america by the numbers segment. >> church is the most visited historic site. over half a million peop
is structured, you will not invest as much there. if you think northern africa or nigeria or russia will grow, you will be willing to take more risks there because you think the growth is there. to a certain extent, where you seek political upheaval, it scares away investment. the world is so competitive, if you do not focus on markets, if you are not ready to win in markets, you will lose. >> how much of this can be a parochial discussion? let us say ge is a u.s. company, but let us talk about the european or asian companies that may be interested in investing on this side of the world. what will the u.s. due to distinguish itself? >> investment certainty. we need somehow not to have all of the focus on sequestration, debt limits. that is distracting to investors. the systems of competitiveness. education, regulation. tax reform. those things that say we want people to invest in the u.s. our fdi in the country has trailed a lot of other places in the world. some of it is education training. there are systems of competitiveness. we know what they are. it is trying to get more of a window on t
not only changed the middle east, but it will change china. it would change russia. and it has changed our lives. i cannot tell you the changes. we had this conversation a little over two years ago. mubarak is in power. gaddafi is in power. there is no uprising in syria. what you think the world is going to be like two to three years from now? not only is senator klobuchar one the hardest working members of the senate, she is one of the most pleasant to be around. she takes my insults and other barbs with a great deal of good humor, and i enjoy being with her. >> the term mccain standing up like this on immigration is going to make all the difference. we are excited about what is going on. whenever you travel with him as a woman in the foreign country, and, and it is all guys in power, he makes sure he says this woman is a senator of the state of minnesota. he is a great guy. >> ladies and gentleman, a quick word about john mccain. we are talking today about how immigration. over the years, i have seen senator mccain talk about -- detail. i have been with him when he was steaming on campai
. at the same time we'll engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenal and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into the wrong hands. our ability to influence others depends on our willingness to lead and meet our obligations. america must also face a rapidly growing threat from cyberattacks. now we know hackers steal people's identities and infiltrate private emails. we know foreign countries and companies swipe our corporate secrets. now our enemies are also seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid, our financial institutions, our air traffic control systems. we cannot look back years from now and wonder why we did nothing in the face of real threats to our security and our economy. that's why earlier today, i signed a new executived or that will strengthen our cyberdefenses by increasing information sharing and developing standards to protect our national security, jobs, and privacy. but now congress must act as well. by passing legislation to give our government a greater capacity to secure our networks and deter attacks. t
in the competition. post-soviet russia was some kind of a market economy and most of what it reward it was theft and they got an autocracy. we've got to be smart and thoughtful about what is being rewarded in the competition. i think your point is precisely right. if you go to a major law firm or health-care organizations, the most highly compensated are those actually doing the work. this is a place where state compensation schedules actually make it harder, even for the district who wanted to come to act on that principle. a final word of advice on all this, some of what we have talked about today may sound not a part of your responsibility. you're thinking in terms of statutory reform and legislation, execution, but there is a principal named walter jackson in houston who took over a turnaround school. these kids were reading at a second and third grade level. he needed people to actually knew how to teach second and third graders but these new english lit. even though the state of texas was enthusiastic about what they were doing, there are rules on the books concerning teachers of record in
with a distinguished record, including service in the middle east but also did major global power like russia and india, who are playing very interesting roles in the evolving to thomas e. over iran. welcome. and along with time we have our own kenneth pollack, senior fellow in the center, and ken is finishing a book right now on the challenge of iran, which you will be able to look for in books first later this year. we're happy to have ken with us to provide comments on this topic as well. what we will do is we will have a bit of a conversation up here, and then we will open it up for questions from before. -- from the four. why don't we jumped right in with some of these recent developments. there is not a date set for the next round of international negotiations to be held in a distinguished diplomatic capital. one wonders if that quieter location will allow distance from the glare of the cameras. do you expend much progress -- what you expect from these long- awaited talked? >> that you very much. it is a pleasure to be here. i cannot think of a more bountiful crop to bring in out of the rain, for
powers like russia and india, who are playing very interesting roles in the evolving discussions over iran. welcome. and along with time we have our own kenneth pollack, senior fellow in the center, and ken is finishing a book right now on the challenge of iran, which you will be able to look for in book stores later this year. we're happy to have ken with us to provide comments on this topic as well. what we will do is we will have a bit of a conversation up here, and then we will open it up for questions from the floor. why don't we jump right in with some of these recent developments. there is now a date set for the next round of international negotiations to be held in a distinguished diplomatic capital of almaty. one wonders if that quieter location will allow distance from the glare of the cameras. what do you expect from these long-awaited talks? >> thank you very much. it is a pleasure to be here. i cannot think of a more bountiful crop to bring in out of the rain, for what has been the longest-running non-defense discussion about iran in this town for some time. i wish i coul
rid of the tyrannical government. they held a banquet in moscow some years ago to honor one of russia's few heroes. the general was a tank driver in world war ii. the general got up and said, mr. president, my dream is a country like the united states. i think about that because others have pointed out when the soviet empire fell apart, one of the first things countries of the old east bloc, the first thing they did was legalize individual ownership to firearms, not because they would attack their governments, but because they know that is a measure of stability and freedom and it is a symbol of freedom. in this country, a lot of the argument over firearms has less to do with crime as it does with symbolism and what the second amendment represents. prior to the culture wars of the late '60s -- late 1960's, the nra for its first hundred years of existence did not spend money in politics. we did not have a lobbyist and it was not necessary. we divided into two ideological camps in this country. i am not talking about all the gun owners, but the politicians. it has had less to do about c
, close to each other. in the barracks, one of our border units to russia, we have the female soldiers sleeping in the same rooms as their male colleagues all year around. in my batallion in norway, i didn't want this, and we separated. and the reason for this is that when we are deployed, there is a rule, no alcohol. so we don't have all these issues. but the combination with alcohol, young men and women together, that's not always easy. when they came home from -- the few harassment issues we had, they were always combined with alcohol. therefore, i was a little concerned to have them sleeping in the same room. not the possibility to kind of lock their doors and so on. it is sad to tell, but that's the truth. >> the critical mass thing put me on red alert and i have been listening to that. particularly since i saw the article yesterday talking about what the general thinks it means. i do not think they know what they mean by critical mass. having been on staff duty a lot and seeing the compromises that have had to be made to come to accord, to get all four of the service chiefs in li
rachmaninoff premiered his symphony number two in st. petersburg, russia. rachmaninoff was a technical pianist. history records he rarely missed a note despite the enormous complexity of his compositions. but you chose to use your hands to orchestrate other kinds of efforts. you worked both ends of pennsylvania avenue. you and sylvia advocated for the purity of public service. then the nation called again and you answered again. so for the past four years you have led those in the intelligence and defense communities, those trusted with protecting our nation and our families. you have led the fight for the proper amount of resources. you balanced the threat of external attack with the threat of internal insolvency. you once said diversity in america is as old as this nation itself. you did more than just speak about it. you took action. you have insured our forces will be able to draw upon the very best this nation has to offer. you have overseen the fielding of new capabilities to meet the threats of tomorrow, and you have demonstrated that steadfast commitment to families and troops wherever
by sort of laying it out in hazy terms, has left open the rights for russia or china to use a drone that will put the obama administration in a difficult position to complain, because we have not been clear about it. i have confidence that the obama administration is doing this right, and they have good people working on it. they need to be more open. they have not acknowledged in four years and 200 or more drone strikes a single person specifically who has been killed. i think both the american people and the rest of the world would have more confidence if one could come up with a list and say, here are the kinds of people who we have used lethal force against. we do not have to lay out all the intelligence and signals and intercepts, what, who is here it was. -- here is who it was. i think this person was in fact fighting against us and deserved to have a force used against them. you talk about the responsibility of the attorney general. what involvement does the legal advisor to the national security council have? guest: i had two terms. inside the white house, the legal adviser
and what we did to russia. guest: i think there's a lot of focus on the role that china should play in this. if the caller said china is the only country providing goods to north korea these days and there for the north koreans are very dependent on them. china has also invested in a lot of industries in north korea moving out a lot of the minerals. the northern part of north korea is very mineral-rich. they have been moving copper, nickel, iron ore, coal, and to the two inland provinces adjacent to the peninsula to help their own economy in china. they have really been working toward its own benefits on the peninsula in terms of supporting north korea. where there is a lot of effort these days behind the scenes is getting china to contribute to this issue in a way to broaden the security interests of the region which is to do more in terms of persuading north koreans to engage in more responsible behavior. sometimes there requires punishing them. there's more and more pressure on china to do that sort of activity, but thus far it's difficult to say whether that has been successful. host: a
, we will engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenals, and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into the wrong hands -- because our ability to influence others depends on our willingness to lead. america must also face the rapidly growing threat from cyber-attacks. we know hackers steal people's identities and infiltrate private e-mail. we know foreign countries and companies swipe our corporate secrets. now our enemies are also seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid, our financial institutions, and our air traffic control systems. we cannot look back years from now and wonder why we did nothing in the face of real threats to our security and our economy. that's why, earlier today, i signed a new executive order that will strengthen our cyber defenses by increasing information sharing, and developing standards to protect our national security, our jobs, and our privacy. now, congress must act as well, by passing legislation to give our government a greater capacity to secure our networks and deter attacks. eve
from getting a nuclear weapon. [applause] at the same time, we will engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenals, and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into the wrong hands -- because our ability to influence others depends on our willingness to lead. america must also face the rapidly growing threat from cyber-attacks. we know hackers steal people's identities and infiltrate private e-mail. we know foreign countries and companies swipe our corporate secrets. now our enemies are also seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid, our financial institutions, and our air traffic control systems. we cannot look back years from now and wonder why we did nothing in the face of real threats to our security and our economy. that's why, earlier today, i signed a new executive order that will strengthen our cyber defenses by increasing information sharing, and developing standards to protect our national security, our jobs, and our privacy. [applause] now, congress must act as well, by passing legislation to give our governm
flight, whatever it may be. one thing we could do less of for iran but may be more for russia, which seems to be at least aware of the fact that they -- assaad, might have a short half-life is to move over the other side of the fence with brahimi. on our side, this is not a popular view, but to join in with preconditions to negotiations and drop them all, there's no good negotiation, in my view, that starts with the other side requiring it to give up as a consequence. that is not realistic. i do not know why we jump on that? it may have been seen as the one element necessary to keep the syrian obligation together what we tried to move in the other direction, but now that he has made his point of view, we have something of an open door. i would verily like to see, and i do not think the iranians would support it come about the humanitarian cease-fire based on the commitments in negotiations. i also have my own doubts as to whether a transitional government makes so much sense and whether we ought not to arrive to elections. the syrian election commission and the u.n. commission electi
, this is a good opportunity to unite with who should be our strongest ally, which is russia. >> the president heads to the white house this afternoon -- secretary kerry had so the white house this afternoon. he will be traveling to egypt, saudi arabia, the u.k., germany, france, italy kelli turkey, and the united arab emirates. caller: talking about congress and the sequester, that was a some symbols idea. obama wanted that idea to go forward. and now he is trying to blame congress. congress did not come up with the sequestered. it was the obama plan from the beginning. of course now we see obama and the democrats talking about congress. it was a some symbols obama idea. >> it is a little off topic, i will let you go, but the sequester is set to happen next friday, march 1. the pentagon is addressing that next friday and there will be a news conference coming up at 1:00 p.m. eastern to talk about pentagon plans on c-span 2 at 1:00. gail is on the democrat line. what did you think of the secretary's speech? >> i thought that his speech was excellent. i am really grateful for the secretary and
to russia and china. i can understand why the government puts up with this stuff like this, let's this stuff go on. they keep passing laws like that trying to help people. they have not helped people since the reagan administration. have gone downhill ever since. ever since he did away with airline controllers, everything has gone downhill. it is just like coal. all your coal moves out to the east coast, north, and the only reason we are talking about coal is because coal is coming down from the unit -- coal is coming down to the united states from canada. host: front page of "the washington post," "the fed is unlikely to pull stimulus plug soon." "stocks on wednesday tumbled on concerns after a recent meeting growing debate about the initiative with the federal bank, but is the prevailing sentiment at the fed on recent remarks that the central bank's efforts putting tens of billions of dollars into the economy every month should not end anytime soon." right next to that on the front page, "china has hacked most of washington." "this is the usual answer, a list of those hacked in recent year
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